Converge project has made a major contribution to the Scottish economy

A reception at Edinburgh Castle last night [05.03.2013] marked the official end of a programme that pioneered a distinctive approach to industry engagement and is now widely acknowledged as a model of best practice within the Scottish university sector.

End of Converge Event in Edinburgh

End of Converge Event in Edinburgh

The Converge project – funded by the European Regional Development Fund – was initiated in 2009 to create a world-leading resource for the University to forge links with industry; exchange knowledge; develop businesses and create jobs in Scotland.

A key aim of the project was to develop long term relationships with partners in industry and to specifically address their individual needs. The Heriot-Watt Business Development team acted as a first port of call – an interface between the companies and the University’s research teams.

Through Converge the University has worked on collaborative projects with companies of varying sizes, from micro companies through to large multinationals in a diverse spectrum of sectors, from high value manufacturing to energy and food and drink. The Engineering Design placements exemplify the approach. They are small, company-led research and design projects that companies give to students to manage. Last year’s programme saw 95 students working on 19 separate projects for 17 different companies including MacPhie of Glenbervie, MacTaggart Scott and STATS Group. The value of these projects has been recognised by oilfield service giant, Baker Hughes, which this year sponsored awards for participating students.

The ERDF funding was used to hire staff who undertook four main areas of activity: Entrepreneurship; Business Development; Marketing and Enterprise Creation through university spin-outs and the successful Converge Challenge, now Scotland’s largest university start-up competition. The results have been impressive:

  • The total collaborative value of the project is £8million and it has supported 250 enterprises and the creation      of 30 new products
  • 25 new companies have been created in just over 3 years, raising a total of £1.2m investment
  • Businesses helped by Converge expect to increase their turnover by £14.1 million and attribute £5.1 million of this increase directly to the University’s business development team
  • These businesses expect to create an extra 146 jobs over the next 3 years
  • If activity supported by the Converge project is sustained, then the project is expected to contribute an additional £36.6m GVA per year to the Scottish economy
Professor Alan Miller, Deputy Principal, Research and Enterprise Services speech

Professor Alan Miller, Deputy Principal, Research and Enterprise Services speech

Speaking at the launch, Professor Alan Miller, Deputy Principal, Research and Enterprise Services said:

“These collaborations have been truly symbiotic. For our partners they have led to new products, services, increased turnover and new jobs. Heriot-Watt has enjoyed publishable results, the opportunity to contribute research expertise; new licenses and long-term collaborative opportunities for academics. We wanted to create a world-leading resource for Heriot-Watt to be able to quickly and effectively respond to enquiries from industry. I think we can safely say – mission accomplished.”

IPCC warning: industry cannot be isolated or insulated from climate change

The Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), has informed industry that it “cannot be insulated or isolated from the impacts of climate change”.At the industry day event organised by Heriot-Watt University (on Tuesday 26 February), he said,

“Industry and business around the world, across every sector, cannot expect to be insulated or isolated from climate change. It will impact economic growth, the availability of skilled labour, workers’ health, and the global flow of goods and raw materials. Companies which depend on climate sensitive supply of raw materials such as agricultural and dairy products may need to consider action to secure their supply chains. Large companies in particular should consider taking action now to secure their supply chains.

Dr Pachauri addressing Heriot-Watt University for the Sustainable Development Event

Dr Pachauri addressing Heriot-Watt University for the Sustainable Development Event

“I’d say, based on the findings of the Fourth Assessment Report of the IPCC and our Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation, that business has huge opportunities in tapping into the growing market for products and services that help reduce greenhouse gases and enable countries and communities to adapt to changes in the climate. They should not be left behind.”

He also hailed purse power. He said,

“Companies should consider possible reputational implications if they do not provide what society expects of them. Consumers could increasingly demand and place a higher premium on goods with a low carbon impact.”

Referring to Scotland’s targets of reducing climate emissions by 80 per cent (on 1990 levels) by 2050 he said,

“I’m very impressed by Scotland’s ambitious drive to reduce carbon emissions – this can be an example to the world.”

 Dr Pachauri Heriot-Watt University Visit to High Speed Rail testing Rig
Dr Pachauri Heriot-Watt University Visit to High Speed Rail testing Rig

Professor Steve Chapman, Principal of Heriot-Watt University, said,

“Along with other Scottish universities, our focus is on working with industry to develop solutions to global challenges through cutting-edge research – whether that’s in sectors such as high speed rail or carbon capture and storage. As part of this, we continue to develop commercially viable solutions through expanding our research intensification.”

Dr Pachauri also opened new labs at Heriot-Watt University where researchers are developing inexpensive, environmentally-friendly solar cell technology, which has a low upfront capital investment requirement and is therefore suitable for countries in the developing world. The team is being led by Professor Hari Upadhyaya who leads on energy engineering at the University’s School of Engineering and Physical Sciences.

Energy Conversion Lab using environmentally-friendly solar cell technology

Energy Conversion Lab using environmentally-friendly solar cell technology

Dr Pachauri made the comments as he addressed around 400 academics and industry leaders at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, UK, on the challenges and opportunities that climate change presents to industry.

New Energy Conversion Laboratory Opens at Heriot-Watt University

Professor Alan Miller, Dr Pachauri, Professor Steve Chapman and Professor Hari Upadhaya

Professor Alan Miller, Dr Pachauri, Professor Steve Chapman and Professor Hari Upadhaya

In a short ceremony on Tuesday on the 26th of February Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chair of the Nobel Peace Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and director general of TERI (The Energy Resources Institute), opened the new labs.

In the Energy Conversion Lab researchers are developing low cost, environmentally friendly solar cell technology, which has a low upfront capital investment requirement, and is therefore suitable for countries around the world. The PV sector that looks set for double digit growth in the coming years with this low cost technology now having great commercial potential.

Professor Hari Upadhyaya, who recently joined Heriot-Watt University, leads the team on energy engineering at the University’s School of Engineering and Physical Sciences and has over 20 years’ experience in thin film PV, establishing low cost (non-vacuum) and conventional (vacuum based) thin-film materials.

Following the Lab opening, Dr Pachauri, was then taken on a tour of the University including learning more about Carbon Capture technologies from Professor Mercedes Maroto-Valer and was shown the new high speed rail testing rig by Professor Peter Woodward.

Professor Mercedes Maroto-Valer and Dr Pachauri

Professor Mercedes Maroto-Valer and Dr Pachauri

Professor Peter Woodward explains to Dr Pachauri the work Heriot-Watt is doing in high speed rail

Professor Peter Woodward explains to Dr Pachauri the work Heriot-Watt is doing in high speed rail

The Principal Professor Steve Chapman and Professor Alan Miller, Deputy Principal Research and Knowledge Transfer joined Dr Pachauri on the tour of the facilities with the Principal commenting “I am very impressed with the cutting-edge research Heriot-Watt is doing in solar cell technology, carbon capture and storage, as well as high speed rail. Working with industry on key projects such as these is vital to Heriot-Watt University as we continue to develop commercially viable solutions to global challenges through expanding our research intensification.”

Wooden’ denim could cut carbon emissions of global jeans industry

Jeans developed by a Heriot-Watt School of Textiles and Design student, using a fibre made from sustainable wood instead of cotton, could be the key to cutting carbon emissions in the jeans industry around the world.

Dawn Ellams

Dawn Ellams

Saving energy and water

The jeans have cotton-like qualities but only use one fifth of the water, energy and chemicals needed to manufacture conventional jeans.

Dawn Ellams, a PhD researcher at Heriot-Watt’s Scottish Borders Campus, also used digital printing technology to create a stone-washed denim effect on the textile.

Manufacturing one pair of cotton denim jeans uses on average 42 litres of water and is energy intensive. Conventional denim production methods can also require up to 15 dyeing vats and an array of harmful chemicals.

Now Dawn’s research has identified several areas within the manufacturing process which offer opportunities for saving water and reducing carbon emissions.

She said, “The sustainability issues associated with the manufacturing of cotton garments are already well understood, yet the use of cotton shows no sign of diminishing. The research challenged the design and manufacture of denim jeans, probably the most iconic use of cotton. The overall aim was to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and water use associated with conventional manufacturing for denim jeans.”

Dawn, a student at Heriot-Watts School of Textiles in Galashiels, Scottish Borders created the eco-friendly jeans with pulp from eucalyptus trees

Dawn, a student at Heriot-Watts School of Textiles in Galashiels, Scottish Borders created the eco-friendly jeans with pulp from eucalyptus trees

Dawn worked closely with Jim McVee, Business Development Manager at the School of Textiles & Design, who was able to assist her with the development of the denim garment.

The ‘no-cotton’ jeans are made using Tencel®, a fibre created by man-made cellulose fibre production company, Lenzing AG.

Michael Kininmonth, Business Development and Project Manager for Lenzing AG, said, “When I speak to textile students I try and impress on them that sustainable issues are now at the top of the agenda of many leading companies within the textile supply chain.

“This newly developing business climate provides students a mandate to think in more radical ways and challenge long established conventional products and processes.  Innovation is the life’s blood of today’s denim industry and there are strong environmental reasons why this production route, if honed, might have a serious chance of being adopted commercially.”

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2276940/Do-stick-wear-jeans-Student-creates-eco-denim-collection-using-bits-WOOD.html?ito=feeds-newsxml#axzz2KgVQrs8Z

Sustainable Devlopment Event App

Phone App pictureFor those of registered for our Industry Day, you can now download the APP for your mobile devices.

Heriot-Watt University’s third annual industry day which this year focuses on Infrastructure Challenges and Solutions in Sustainable Development. This year is bigger and better than ever and brings together thought leaders from both academia and industry in this key event.

In the APP you can access the same features as our brochure including:

  • About the Event
  • Program Schedule
  • Speaker Bio’s
  • Map

Download the APP to your Iphone, Ipad or Android device below

https://kitapps.com/profile/HeriotWattIndustryDay2013/

This year we are privileged to welcome Dr. Pachauri, the Chair of the Nobel Peace Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and director of TERI (The Energy and Resources Institute). Dr Pachauri is a prominent researcher on environmental subjects, recognised internationally for his efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change.  I am sure we are all looking forward to his keynote address on Meeting the Challenge of Climate Change and the Role of Industry and you can read his Bio on the APP.

Printed human organs for testing and transplantation

This story has got been generating lots of media interest from around the world this week.

A specialised 3D printing process, using human stem cells, could pave the way to purpose-built replacement organs for patients, eliminating the need for organ donation, immune suppression and the problem of transplant rejection.

The process, developed at Heriot-Watt University, in partnership with Roslin Cellab, takes advantage of the fact that stem cells can now be grown in laboratory conditions from established cell lines, could also speed up and improve the process of drug testing by growing three-dimensional human tissues and structures for pharmaceuticals to be tested on.

3D printing with embryonic stem cells

3D printing with embryonic stem cells

New valve-based technique

A range of human stem cell cultures can now be grown, generation after generation, in laboratory conditions. Those cultures developed from cells from areas like bone marrow or skin are hardier but less flexible than those developed from embryonic material. While 3D printing of the tougher cell cultures has been achieved before, the new valve-based technique developed by Dr Will Shu and his colleagues at Heriot-Watt’s Biomedical Microengineering group are the first to print the more delicate embryonic cell cultures, which have an ability to replicate indefinitely and differentiate into almost any cell type in the human body.

Dr Shu said, “To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that these cells have been 3D printed. The technique will allow us to create more accurate human tissue models which are essential to in vitro drug development and toxicity-testing. Since the majority of drug discovery is targeting human disease, it makes sense to use human tissues.

Dr Will Shu LecturerSchool of Engineering & Physical Sciences; BioChemistry,BioPhysics & BioEngineering

Dr Will Shu Lecturer
School of Engineering & Physical Sciences; BioChemistry,BioPhysics & BioEngineering

Dr Shu’s team are working with Roslin Cellab, a leading stem cell technology company. The company has a good track record of applying new technologies to human stem cell systems and will take the lead in developing 3D stem cell printing for commercial uses. Initially this will be in the areas of novel drug-testing products but in the longer term there is the goal of growing purpose-built replacement organs.

“In the longer term, we envisage the technology being further developed to create viable 3D organs for medical implantation from a patient’s own cells, eliminating the need for organ donation, immune suppression and the problem of transplant rejection.”

Other links

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-21328109

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/9849212/New-3D-printing-technique-could-speed-up-progress-towards-creation-of-artificial-organs.html

Dr Adebayo Adeloye to talk on reservoir management at Industry Day 26th February 2013

Dr Adebayo Adeloye will be speaking at our Industry Day event in the Meeting the Hydro-nation Challenge Session on the “Enhancing the effectiveness of heuristic rule curves for water supply reservoir operation”.

Heriot-Watt’s Annual Industry Day takes place on the 26th February 2012. To register please click on http://sustdev.eventbrite.co.uk/

Dr Adebayo Adeloye

Dr Adebayo Adeloye is a Senior Lecturer in the School of the Built Environment, at Heriot-Watt University.

At this session delegates can get a better understanding of reservoir management and the importance of enhanced control curves in guiding the operation of water supply reservoirs. His speech will explore water reservoir storage-yield-performance functions and its development, as well as evaluation of new performance criteria for water resources systems.

His other areas of research interest include:

  • Rainfall-runoff modeling.
  • Investigation of scale (temporal and spatial) effects on water resources systems characteristics and performance
  • Development of data-limited generalised water resources planning/assessment tools
  • Climate change impacts assessment on water resources and quantification of the uncertainty
  • Development of adaptation strategies for coping with water resources assessment
  • Development of more robust control curves for more effective operation of water resources systems
  • Application of machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) paradigms to water resources and water quality problems
  • Development of software sensors for measuring water quality variables such as the BOD5  in raw and wastewater treatment effluent streams
  • Development of AI-based models for the operation, control and fault detection of  wastewater treatment plants
  • Development of AI-based models for evaporation and evapotranspiration and application in irrigation water scheduling and application
  • Integrated water resources management and development of participatory approaches to water resources planning and management
  • Mathematical modeling and optimisation of groundwater resources, with emphasis on arid and semi-arid conditions.
  • Optimisation of irrigation water application
  • Economic value of river flow and other data and application in the design of data collection networks
  • Statistical analysis of floods and low flows

Digital tools for Design, Manufacture and Knowledge Capture – Professor Jim Ritchie to talk at Industry Day 26th February 2013

Jim Ritchie will be speaking at our Industry Day event on the “Sustainable Development: Infrastructure Challenges and Solutions” in session on Materials and Design technology.

Heriot-Watt’s Annual Industry Day takes place on the 26th February 2012. To register please click on http://sustdev.eventbrite.co.uk/

Professor Jim Ritchie is the Head of Institute (Institute of Mechanical, Process and Energy Engineering) at Heriot-Watt University.

Jim Ritchie Head of Institute of Mechanical, Process and Energy Engineering

Jim Ritchie Head of Institute of Mechanical, Process and Energy Engineering

His research outputs have included digital tools for design and manufacture, including VR applications and logistics. The work exploits advanced digital techniques for improving the effectiveness of product engineering, for example in the use of knowledge engineering for product knowledge and information capture and reuse and the application of digital tools to design, manufacturing process simulation and planning.

He is a Chartered Engineer with substantial industrial and engineering management experience in both design and manufacture. He has also been involved extensively in TEMPUS, EU, EPSRC and KTP projects.

Other areas of research involvement have included capability maturity modelling of the engineering design process, quality methods in the food industry, laser cutting, austenitic manganese steel machining, transport management and rapid prototyping.

He has over 140 journal and conference publications, has presented the results of the IMRC’s work at a many international institutions and conferences and is regularly invited onto Scientific Committees associated with virtual reality applications in engineering.

His current areas of research interest include:
• Design/manufacture
• Virtual manufacturing
• Digital engineering
• Engineering knowledge capture
• Serious games for engineering.

Enhanced Oil Recovery Video EOR

How can we extract more oil from North Sea Oil Reserves?

With over half of the North Sea’s oil yet to be extracted, Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) could have huge impacts for the Scottish economy. By recovering just 1% oil, at today’s prices, that would equate to $28 billion dollars of extra oil recovered.

Listen to 2 of Heriot-Watt universities thought leaders on EOR, Professor Eric Mackay from the Institute of Petroleum Engineering and Professor Mehran Sohrabi from the Centre for Enhance Oil Recovery and CO2 Solutions.

Research activity within the Institute of Petroleum Engineering spans  across the complete spectrum from exploration, through reservoir appraisal and development, to production technology.  The school can provide complete solutions to its industry clients and offers a multifaceted service as shown on the diagram below.

If you are interested in learning more about our consultancy services please contact us and we will work with you to tailor a consultancy programme that meets your requirements please contact Gordon Winton, Business Development Executive at gordon.winton@pet.hw.ac.uk

Recognised internationally as a leading centre of excellence in petroleum engineering and petroleum geosciences teaching, training and research with strong links to industry worldwide.

Recognised internationally as a leading centre of excellence in petroleum engineering and petroleum geosciences teaching, training and research with strong links to industry worldwide.

The Economic Impact of Heriot-Watt University

Here is the video from our Economic Impact Launch on Tuesday (4th December 2012). It contains lots of compelling statistics about the work of the University and the effect this has on the local and national economy.

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